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Are you a photographer or a tourist?

In Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, ND Filters, Polarizing Filters, Scenes & Scenarios by Gary HartLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: Having recently experienced this dilemma on a trip with my daughter, I found this article by Gary to be especially meaningful. We hope you do, too. Warm Light, El Capitan Clearing Storm, Yosemite (2007) Canon EOS-1Ds Mark II, 17 mm, 1/6 second, F/11, ISO 100, Singh-Ray neutral polarizer and Galen Rowell graduated neutral density filter. Years of leading photo workshops and reviewing the work of others has convinced me that to capture great images and maintain domestic bliss, …

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Photoshop and six tools… with a video demonstration

In Black & White, Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, ND Filters, Post-Processing, Scenes & Scenarios by Cole ThompsonLeave a Comment

Editor’s note: We are huge admirers of Cole’s work and have always wondered how he processed his memorable B&W images. Here Cole describes his process – and illustrates it with the video included in this article. Cole uses the Singh-Ray Vari-ND variable neutral density filter and our Mor-Slo 5-, 10-, 15- and 20-stop solid neutral density filters to help create many of his images. A friend and I were recently discussing how I process my images. I was trying to …

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5 reasons why you should be using a circular polarizing filter

In Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, Polarizing Filters, Scenes & Scenarios by Don SmithLeave a Comment

  The sun sets through fog as seen from Fremont Peak State Park, San Benito County, California (Sony a7R II, Sony/Zeiss 24-70mm, f/22, 1/10th, ISO 100, Singh-Ray Neutral Polarizer) If you are serious about your landscape photography, there is one filter that should be on each lens in your bag – a polarizer! Why? Well, that is what I will discuss in this article. But first you need to understand that the one filter that cannot be re-created in post-processing …

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My 3-stop reverse graduated ND filter. An essential tool for shooting sunsets.

In Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, ND Filters, Scenes & Scenarios by Brady CabeLeave a Comment

Typical graduated filters are darkest at one end, and gradually lighten up along the length of the filter. These are essential for any landscape photographer’s kit, and are commonly used when the sun is above the frame, for instance in the late afternoon. They help balance the exposure of a bright sky and a darker foreground scene. The problem with this filter when photographing sunsets, is that the frame is typically brightest towards the middle, or top third, of the frame, meaning …

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Photographing moving water

In Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, ND Filters, Polarizing Filters, Scenes & Scenarios, Water Features, Wildlife by Robert ClarkLeave a Comment

Moving water – waterfalls, rivers, streams and surf – often presents unique challenges to the landscape photographer. The most common way to capture images of moving water is to use a slower shutter speed. But how slow should the shutter speed be? The answer largely depends on the effect you are looking for in the final image. I normally divide my approach to shooting moving water into these three desired effects: – Silky – Milky – Textural The silky effect …

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“All-in-camera, old school photography” with digital cameras, Part 1

In Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, ND Filters, Scenes & Scenarios by Randall J. HodgesLeave a Comment

“To Photoshop” or “not to Photoshop,” that is the question. Well, not really, but for an all-in-camera professional like myself, there really is no choice. I believe there is absolutely nothing wrong with Photoshop, Lightroom or any other post-processing techniques used to create images, as this is the accepted norm these days. In fact, I’m a fan of many professionals out there who post process their images and produce outstanding images using their post processing tools. I believe each individual …

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New creative interpretations with slower exposure times

In Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, ND Filters, Scenes & Scenarios, Water Features by Ellen AnonLeave a Comment

As the digital era has evolved and cameras are ubiquitous, there are more and more images of literally everything, to the point that sometimes people wonder if it’s possible to make a photograph that’s original. One of the reasons that I enjoy using Singh-Ray filters, such as the Mor-Slos and the Vari-ND is that I can transform what I see in front of me into my interpretation of it, rather than just a documentary-style image, while maintaining the highest possible …

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“Cleanse your palette” Another approach to using solid neutral density filters

In Equipment & Technique, Landscapes, ND Filters, Scenes & Scenarios, Water Features by Chuck KimmerleLeave a Comment

Solid neutral density filters – I use Singh-Ray Mor-Slo and George Lepp solid ND filters – have become increasingly popular the past few years. Their ability to increase exposure times from 1-stop to 20-stops (2x to, amazingly, more than 1,000,000x) helps to emphasize motion, thus adding a soft and ephemeral feel to moving elements such as waterfalls and clouds. However, there is another use for these filters beyond emphasizing motion, and that is to hide it. To soften detail. To …

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Pursuing subtle

In Landscapes, Scenes & Scenarios, Wildlife by Mark LissickLeave a Comment

In this age of “in-your-face” visual imagery we have come to be enamored by explosive vibrancy. Images are designed with easily categorized subjects allowing the viewer the ability to quickly digest the visual message and then move on. In the realm of artistic endeavor this is becoming almost formulaic. While some fantastic images are the result, such design structuring can stifle one’s imagination. Creativity does not thrive in a box. Images that limit the viewer’s choices leave little for interpretation …

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The grass is greener

In Landscapes, Scenes & Scenarios by Gary HartLeave a Comment

  “Under the Weather, Sierra Foothills, California,” Sony a7R, Sony/Zeiss 16-35, 1/8 second, F/11, ISO 100 “You’re so lucky to live so close to ”: Yosemite, Lake Tahoe, Big Sur, San Francisco, Muir Woods (and countless other coastal redwood sites), Point Reyes, the Napa Valley wine country, Mt. Shasta, Mono Lake. I hear it all the time. Okay, I’ll concede that—I’m lucky. But… Their implicit message is, “If only I lived closer to such-and-such, my photography would be so much better.” But …